Green Reads

Green Reads are book reviews by Green House Think Tank which reflect on work relevant to green politics.

Max Farmiloe

Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World: the implications of René Girard’s thought for consumer society.

Max Familioe considers the work of René Girard on desire, and it's relevant to Rethinking Demand and Facing up to Climate Relativity.



Anne Chapman

Countdown

Review of Book 'Countdown - How our Modern World is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race'.



Andrew Mearman

A Guide to the Systems of Provision Approach

A review of A Guide to the Systems of Provision Approach by Kate Bayliss and Ben Fine, highlighting its relevance for greens seeking to understand consumption and demand.



Prashant Vaze

The Ministry of the Future

Prashant Vaze's review of Kim Stanley Robinson's novel about an organisation, established under the Paris Agreement, whose mission is to advocate for the world's future generations of citizens as if their rights are as valid as the present generation's



Anne Chapman

Toxic Legacy, How the weedkiller glyphosate is destroying our health and the environment

Glyphosate is a very widely used general weed killer. Much of the public discussion about its safety is around whether it causes cancer. But Stephanie Seneff's book highlights all the other ways that glyphosate can damage our health.



John Foster

The Climate Majority: Apathy and Action in the Age of Nationalism

John Foster's review of Leo Barasi's book examining 'the swings'- people who accept climate change but are apathetic towards acting to mitigate it.



Anne Chapman

A Small Farm Future

Chris Smaje argues that the best future we can now hope for is a small farm future (as opposed to the increasingly big farm present), in which many more people than now are involved in food production, mostly on privately-owned small-holdings – realising the old demand for ‘three acres and a cow’.



John Foster

Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?

John Foster's review of Bill McKibben's book examining the possibility of the ending of 'the human game' and the declining significance of humans in the face of rising AI.



John Foster

Deep Adaptation: Navigating the Realities of Climate Chaos

'Deep Adaptation' (2021), highlights the dangers of trying to cover too many bases. Deep Adaptation serves to illustrate the deep truth of our times: that, desperate as our plight may appear, hopeful adaptation however characterised cannot be of the self to an inevitably collapsing world



Anne Chapman

Parents For A Future

Much of the book addresses a problem much discussed in environmental philosophy, which is why we should care about what happens in the future, particularly the distant future when we will be long dead. Read’s answer is simply that the future matters to us because we love our children



Prashant Vaze

Post Growth: Life After Capitalism

Life After Capitalism answers the question: what should be society’s focus if we shake off our obsession with GDP growth? It draws on Jackson’s recent role as director of the inter-disciplinary Centre for the Understanding Sustainable Prosperity and plucks ideas from many disciplines



Anne Chapman

Food in a Changing Climate

Food in a Changing Climate is part of a series called SocietyNow. Books in this series are intended to be ‘short, informed books, explaining why our world is the way it is, now’ and that make ‘the best of academic expertise accessible to wider audience’